September 30, 2022

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Report: Google acquires MicroLED startup Raxium to aid AR headset ambitions

3 min read



Google LLC has big ambitions in the augmented reality business, if reports that it has just paid $ 1 billion to acquire a startup called Raxium are to be believed.

The Information, which broke the story, said Google’s acquisition of Raxium is a sign that it’s seriously focused on building the components required to make AR devices a reality.

“Google has struck a deal to buy Raxium, a five-year-old startup that develops tiny light-emitting diodes for displays used in augmented and mixed reality devices,” The Information said. The deal has not been officially confirmed by either company, although the report adds Google is also looking at more acquisitions related to AR headset components.

Raxium is a startup based in Fremont, California, that develops MicroLED displays used in AR headsets and other devices. MicroLED is an emerging technology that holds a lot of promise, but it’s currently limited to extremely expensive, large-sized screens, such as wall-mounted signage.

MicroLED is inorganic, similar to LCD displays, but it’s supposed to have OLED qualities such as high brightness, good color fidelity and high contrast. But the most important aspect of MicroLED is its energy efficiency, which is a key requirement of wearable devices such as headsets.

Raxium, which has yet to launch any product, has reportedly come up with a more efficient manufacturing technique for MicroLED that may reduce production costs.

The Information said Google is buying Raxium so it can integrate its MicroLED displays with its latest AR headset. It’s believed that Google is currently working on such a device, codenamed Project Iris, and hopes to ship it sometime in 2024.

Google is no newcomer to AR. It was in fact one of the first companies to attempt a consumer-grade AR gadget with Google Glass, only to shelve the idea after receiving strong backlash, with beta testers receiving the harsh nickname “glassholes.”

However, Google Glass eventually found its call in the enterprise. Nowadays, with the rise of concepts such as the metaverse, consumers are more open to wearing glasses and headsets and experiencing virtual worlds.

Earlier, in 2020, Google acquired Canadian smart glasses startup North Inc. through a deal reportedly valued at $ 180 million. The transaction bought Google a technology developed by North that uses a laser projector attached to the frame of an AR headset to display content for users. That technology could also prove useful for any AR headset it might be working on.

Google clearly doesn’t want to be left behind. One of its main rivals in the AR space will be Meta Platforms Inc., the parent company of Facebook, which is said to be working on a new device called Project Cambria, in addition to its existing Quest 2 virtual reality headset. Apple Inc. is also said to be working on a mixed-reality headset and a pair of AR glasses. Both companies have made acquisitions of AR startups in recent years.

Google clearly doesn’t want to be left behind. One of its main rivals in the AR market will be Meta Platforms Inc., the parent company of Facebook, which is said to be working on a new device called Project Cambria, in addition to its existing Quest 2 virtual reality headset. Apple Inc. is also said to be working on a mixed-reality headset and a pair of AR glasses. Both companies have made acquisitions of AR startups in recent years.

Image: Raxium

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